Sad Puppies VS the Hugo-nots

So if you like Science Fiction and Fantasy (but don’t know what the Sad Puppies are and aren’t interested in finding out), you might be interested to learn what a Puppy-free alternate ballot might have looked like.

The Official Hugo Winners

Okay, I want the drama: what’s a Sad Puppy?

Why is No Award good again?

 

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Epistolary Book Chat List

Our August Book Chat theme was epistolary books (novels in letters, or books about or containing letters). Here’s a list of some of the titles we discussed, listed alphabetically by the author’s last name:

Fiction

Tara Altebrando & Sara Zarr, Roomies (YA)
Jay Asher, Thirteen Reasons Why (YA)
Nick Bantock, Griffin & Sabine (series of 6)
Annie Barrows, The Truth According to Us
Jessica Brockmole, Letters from Skye
Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower (YA)
Ellen Datlow & Terri Windling (editors), Queen Victoria’s Book of Spells: an anthology of gaslamp fantasy (includes one epistolary story)
Mark Dunn, Ella Minnow Pea
Helene Gremillon, The Confidant
Daniel Handler & Maira Kalman, Why We Broke Up (YA, illustrated)
John Hersey, Antonietta
Alice Kuipers, Life on the Refrigerator Door
Choderlos de Laclos, Dangerous Liaisons
Annabel Pitcher, Ketchup Clouds (YA)
Marilynne Robinson, Gilead
Rainbow Rowell, Attachments
Julie Schumacher, Dear Committee Members
Lionel Shriver, We Need to Talk About Kevin
Mary Ann Shaffer & Annie Barrows, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society
Diane Smith, Letters from Yellowstone
Dominic Utton, Martin Harbottle’s Appreciation of Time
Patricia C. Wrede & Caroline Stevermer, Sorcery and Cecilia, or the Enchanted Chocolate Pot (YA)

Nonfiction

My Dearest Friend: Letters of Abigail and John Adams
Selected Letters of Jane Austen
Simon Garfield, To the Letter: A Celebration of the Lost Art of Letter Writing
Helene Hanff, 84, Charing Cross Road
Rachel Kapelke-Dale & Jessica Pan, Graduates in Wonderland
Nina Sankovitch, Signed, Sealed, Delivered: Celebrating the Joys of Letter Writing
Nina Stibbe, Love, Nina: A Nanny Writes Home
Cheryl Strayed, Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar (try the audiobook!)
Shaun Usher, Letters of Note

YA = Young Adult

What’s your favorite epistolary novel or collection of letters?

The book chat group is now on hiatus, but all of the library’s other book groups always welcome new members. And if you aren’t participating in summer reading – why not?

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Enter a cyber art gallery – by Robbins Staff – second in the series

As promised, here is the second installment of the staff artwork project.  Questions are welcome – just post in the comments section at end.

Part Two

Fused glass bowls and plates  by Sue Priver

 Fused glass is a warm glass art technique.  Glass is heated in a kiln up to 1100 –                  1500 degrees Fahrenheit.  The process is repeated to form the finished product.                    All glass pieces are fully usable and safe for use with food.

Plate with flowers

Plate with flowers

 

Plate with linear design

Plate with linear design

Dish with fabric design

Bowl with fabric design

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Decorative bowl

Decorative bowl

 

 

                       Crochet art by Willow Hearth

 

Tiny Ursula

Tiny Ursula

 

                             Acrylic painting by Lucy Holley

Frog & Toadstools

Frog & Toadstools

 

                   Decorative Eggs  by Lucy Holley

These eggs were crafted in polymer clay using the mokume-gane and  millefiore        techniques.

Collection of eggs

Collection of eggs

 

                      Watercolor by Ellen Wendruff

Flowers without borders

Flowers without borders

 

                        Pastel drawing of dog  by Ellen Wendruff

Dog

Dog

 

                              Oil painting by Ellen Wendruff

Oil painting after Degas' pastel "The Tub"

Oil painting after a Degas pastel “Le Tub”

 

                                                            Digital photo

Looking Up

Looking Up

 

                   Selected Art and Craft books —

Acrylic painting techniques  by Frederic Miller

Basic glass fusing by Lynn Haunstein

Creepy cut crochet: zombies, ninjas, robots, and more!  by Christen Haden

Decorative eggs: exquisite designs with wax & dye  by Jane Pollak

Digital photography: a basic manual by Henry Horenstein

Digital photography complete course  by DK Publishing

Drawing & painting trees in the landscape   by Claudia Nice

Knitting for the absolute beginner by Alison Dupernex

Mastering the watercolor wash by Joe Garcia

Oil painting basics landscape painting

Painting nature in watercolor…using watercolor pencil & paint  by Cathy Johnson

Painting vibrant watercolors: discover the magic of light, color, & contrast by Soon Y. Warren

Sculpting the figure in clay: an artistic & technical journey to understanding…figurative sculpture  by Peter Rubino

Sketchbook project: World tour by Steven Peterman

The timeless way of building by Christopher Alexander

Urban watercolor sketching: a guide to drawing, painting & storytelling in color  by Felix Schienberger

What painting is: How to think about oil painting using the language of alchemy by James Elkins

                                                       

                                                    

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Enter a cyber gallery of art — by Robbins staff

The following is a  collection of the many and varied examples of original artwork crafted by our staff.  Due to the numerous contributions- coupled with gallery space limitations –  one blog post could not comfortably contain all entries.

Therefore, the cyber art gallery will appear as a two-part series.  This post represents the first.

Artwork appears in no particular order and is arranged  by artist whenever possible. If you have a question about the artwork just post it in the comments section at the end and we will respond.

PART ONE

3 D and 2 D photographs by Steve McInerny

Jordan Pond

Jordan Pond

Offset (3 D) photos are meant to be viewed with special glasses for full effect.

Cascades

Cascades

 

Cascades

Cascades

 

Ice

Ice

 Ice was photographed using a Stereo Realist film camera circa 1940.

Jordan Pond

Jordan Pond

 3 D photographs are known as anaglyphs and require red and cyan (blue-green) glasses  

Jordan Pond

Jordan Pond

 

3 D glasses

3 D glasses

 

 A pen and ink and watercolor using a wash technique

Tree

Tree

                                                     

 

by Lucy Holley

 

wool scarf

wool scarf

 

      

Photo of scarf knit by Jenny Arch

Photo of scarf knit by Jenny Arch

            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Jenny Arch

 

 

 

 

 

Crochet art by Willow Hearth 

  Magical, mystical, mundane, I can crochet almost anything.  I’ve been crocheting for about 9 years and love coming up with new patterns and creations.  

Ursula

Ursula

Maleficent

Maleficent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ursula and Maleficent

Ursula and Maleficent

Toothless is from the movie How to Train Your Dragon

Toothless

Toothless

Mini Me

Mini me

Minions

Minions

Minions are from the movie Despicable Me

a crowd of fairies

a crowd of fairies

 

Discworld

Discworld

Discworld is the name of a fantasy book series by author Terry Pratchett.

 

Painting with melted crayons by Ellen Wendruff

Birdbath & flowers

Birdbath & flowers

 

Oil painting and sculpture by Ellen Wendruff

Forest

Forest

 

            

Figure in clay

Figure in clay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a rooster designed in copper on a wood backing  by Ellen Wendruff

Rooster

Rooster

 

Stay tuned for PART TWO…

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Next NSYA Book Group Meeting

blackpotatoesThe Not-So-Young Adult Book Group will meet next on September 15 at 7pm in the 4th floor conference room.

We’ll be discussing Black Potatoes: The Story of the Great Irish Famine, 1845-1850 by Susan Campbell Bartoletti. Here’s the description from Goodreads:

“In 1845, a disaster struck Ireland. Overnight, a mysterious blight attacked the potato crops, turning the potatoes black and destroying the only real food of nearly six million people.

Over the next five years, the blight attacked again and again. These years are known today as the Great Irish Famine, a time when one million people died from starvation and disease and two million more fled their homeland. 

Black Potatoes is the compelling story of men, women, and children who defied landlords and searched empty fields for scraps of harvested vegetables and edible weeds to eat, who walked several miles each day to hard-labor jobs for meager wages and to reach soup kitchens, and who committed crimes just to be sent to jail, where they were assured of a meal. It’s the story of children and adults who suffered from starvation, disease, and the loss of family and friends, as well as those who died. Illustrated with black and white engravings, it’s also the story of the heroes among the Irish people and how they held on to hope.”

Copies of the book are available now at the Robbins Library circulation desk.

The NSYA Book Group is a friendly, casual book group group for adults in which we read and discuss books written for teens. 

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PSA: Keep your pets safe in the heat

A brindle greyhound snoozing in the sun.If you’re reading this, it means you haven’t melted in this week’s heat yet – congratulations! We hope you’ve been enjoying cool places like the library, or various bodies of water around Massachusetts. If you’re a pet owner, we hope you’ve been making sure your pets keep cool also. Here are some tips for pet safety in the summer from the Humane Society:

  1. NEVER leave your pet in the car. Temperatures in cars can rise to become 30 degrees hotter than the temperature outside. This means on a 90-degree day, it might be 120 degrees inside your car. That is not the kind of hot dog we like in the summer!*
  2. Limit exercise on hot days. Try to walk during the cooler early morning or evening hours, and be aware that asphalt can be too hot for pups’ paws – walk in the shade or on grass if you can.
  3. Don’t rely on a fan. Did you know that dogs don’t sweat like people do? They sweat only through their feet, and cool off by panting. (If it’s too humid out, panting works less well – be aware.)
  4. Provide shade and water. If your pet is outside, make sure s/he has access to shade and water. You can even add ice cubes to your dog’s water for some extra cooling off.
  5. Help your pet cool off from the inside with “pup-sicles.” Here’s a recipe from the Humane Society.
  6. Cool off with a bath. Your cat probably won’t appreciate this technique, but water-loving dogs might.
  7. Watch for signs of heatstroke, including: heavy panting, glazed eyes, rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation (drooling), vomiting, unconsciousness. If your pet has heatstroke, cool him/her off as best you can and get to a vet.

A black poodle/retriever mix puppy.*If library staff notice pets left in cars in the library parking lot, or if patrons report seeing pets alone in cars, we will make an announcement in the library. If the situation isn’t taken care of quickly, we will call the Arlington police non-emergency number or animal control. We don’t like to see animals suffer, so please don’t leave your pet in the car on hot days, even for a short time!

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Not-So-Young Adult Book Group Meets on 8/18

wewereliarsThe NSYA book group will meet next Tuesday, August 18 at 7pm in the 4th floor Conference Room.

We’ll be discussing We Were Liars by E. Lockhart. Copies are available at the circulation desk.

This is our second book choice by E. Lockhart. Back in November of 2012 we discussed one of my favorite books, The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks. If any of the same participants attend next week, I look forward to hearing how you think the two books compare!

If you’re new to this group, we are adults but we read books written for teens. Our discussion and casual and friendly, and new members are always welcome!

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