100 years of Fox Branch Library: Part One

 

Circa 1915 post card view of Crosby School. Built in 1896, with a 1911 addition to the right of the main entrance. From 1917 to 1950, the East Branch Library was located in the basement room to the furthest right in this image. (Courtesy Arlington Historical Society)

Circa 1915 post card view of Crosby School. Built in 1896, with a 1911 addition to the right of the main entrance. From 1917 to 1950, the East Branch Library was located in the basement room to the furthest right in this image. (Courtesy Arlington Historical Society)

 

Local historian Richard A. Duffy, a board member of the Arlington Libraries Foundation since 2013, is today’s guest blogger.

February 15, 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the Fox Branch Library in East Arlington.  This blog post is the first in a two-part series to celebrate this major milestone.

As early as 1888 the trustees of the Arlington Public Library (as Robbins Library was known until 1892) considered the possibility of expanding library services into the “east section” of town.  Since 1883, the rudiments of a branch library had been present in Arlington Heights, with a wicker basket of books sent weekly to the railway station (which also housed the Arlington Heights post office) to enable basic borrowing facilities for patrons in that vicinity.

The suggestion five years later for library services in the east part of town did not gain traction.  The Arlington Heights railroad station was located in the center of that “village,” whereas the Lake Street depot was comparatively isolated.  Moreover, the extensive farmlands of the east meant that most of the population was thinly spread.

A detail from the Beers 1875 atlas shows the Lake Street railway station at center. The open farm fields shown in the vicinity would remain largely unbuilt until the second decade of the 20th century. (Courtesy Arlington Historical Society)

A detail from the Beers 1875 atlas shows the Lake Street railway station at center. The open farm fields shown in the vicinity would remain largely unbuilt until the second decade of the 20th century. (Courtesy Arlington Historical Society)

Still, the evolution of neighborhood library services in the Heights would provide a model for the east to emulate in another three decades.  In 1891 a Heights “reading room” opened in commercial space on Park Avenue (home to Arlington Coal & Lumber today), where library patrons could order books from the main library, read newspapers and magazines, and consult reference works.  The 1909 addition to the Locke School enabled a proper branch library to be established there, with its own small circulating collection enhancing the services offered to Heights residents.

East Arlington quickly gained a stronger identity once the extension of subway service to Harvard Square in 1912 sparked explosive growth in housing construction.  In November 1914, the East Arlington Improvement Association sought the establishment of a library branch, but commercial space was filled about as fast as it was built.  A solution was not apparent, but with prominent East Arlington resident and land developer William Muller having been elected as a library trustee in 1911, the interests of the neighborhood could not have been better represented at that level.

Home of William and Kate Squire Muller at 231 Massachusetts Ave., circa 1910. The building was moved and is still standing at 19 Grafton St. (Robbins Library collection)

Home of William and Kate Squire Muller at 231 Massachusetts Ave., circa 1910. The building was moved and is still standing at 19 Grafton St. (Robbins Library collection)

The opening of the present Arlington High School building in 1915 made its former home at the corner of Academy and Maple streets available for conversion into the town’s first junior high school.  This relieved the Crosby School (at the time the only grammar school in East Arlington) of grade eight, with grade seven soon to follow.   This freed-up space to allow East Arlington to have branch library facilities similar to those in Arlington Heights.  Formal planning got underway in 1916.

Nina L. Winn, a 39-year old resident of 37 Summer St., worked part-time as a library assistant at Robbins Library, and was keenly interested in the East Arlington Branch assignment.  On Monday, November 6, 1916, she wrote in her diary: “Worked [at Robbins Library] from 10 – 12-30 & 2 – 5-15 & [then] telephoned to [library colleague] Eva Smith about East End branch of the library, as I fear Mildred Marsh may be applying.”

On Saturday, December 9, Nina Winn recorded “[Worked at] Library in eve 7-30 to 9.  So stormy that there was not much doing.  Went over early and had a talk about East Branch with [head librarian] Miss [Elizabeth] Newton. Mildred Marsh there to see two of the trustees. She is Miss Newton’s choice, good discipline, literary, etc., but to me quite disagreeable & lacking in manners.”

Two months later, a brief news item in the Arlington Advocate was the extent of public fanfare for the new endeavor:

“The East Arlington Branch of the Robbins Library will be open as of Thursday afternoon, Feb. 15th, at 1:30, in the basement of the Crosby schoolhouse, on Winter Street, where a room has been fitted for the purpose, with an entrance on the north side of the building.  Miss Mildred Marsh will be in attendance and will welcome those who wish to use the library.  Books can be ordered and delivered there from the library at the centre.  Magazines and reference books must be examined there.  The hours for the present will be from 1:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays.”

Early on, some adjustments were needed, as described in the Advocate:

“Beginning on Thursday, March 8, the hours of the East Arlington Branch of Robbins Library will be from 1 to 6, then 6:30 to 9 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. This will enable the schoolchildren to leave their books before 1:30. The room has been well patronized by young people since its opening the middle of February and it is hoped that adults will soon be attracted there also.”

In 1917 the pupils of the Crosby School walked home for their 90-minute lunch break, so having the library open before classes resumed at 1:30 was an obvious improvement.  Less apparent is the rationale to keep the branch open until 9:00 on Saturday evenings.  A century ago, many people had a six-day workweek, so Saturday evening openings, be they at banks, stores, or libraries, were of great importance to adults.

The supervisor’s position at the East Branch ultimately was not that attractive to Mildred L. Marsh, for she resigned to take an office job in Boston in September, Eva Smith taking her place and serving there for many years to come.  The trustees reported that “Miss Marsh rendered important service in the establishment of the Branch and will be gratefully remembered in connection with it.”

The trustees commented on two “firsts” in relation to the new East Branch.  Prosaically, the use of “taxicabs for the transfer of books with entire satisfaction.”  And, much more compelling, “a library of Italian books was borrowed for several months from the Massachusetts Free Public Library Commission.” Later, books in Swedish, Hungarian, and Polish were also made available to serve immigrants, many of whom lived in East Arlington.

In the ensuing decades, East Arlington would fairly burst at the seams with residential, commercial, and institutional development; however, the East Branch did not keep pace.  The 1936 “Report of the Librarian” stated:  “The Robbins Library has two very definite needs.  First:  Branch Library buildings at Arlington Heights and East Arlington. With the estimated division of population of 15,488 at the Heights, 11,404 at the Centre, and 14, 230 at East, it would seem that something must be done.”

The Heights soon gained a spacious and handsome new building at the north corner of Park Avenue and Paul Revere Road, on a former fire station parcel owned by the town.  The Vittoria C. Dallin Branch Library went immediately from success to success.  In East Arlington, there was no comparable site, and its branch was left to wither for lack of space, and face a growing chorus of complaints that its quarters at the Crosby School were unattractive and inconvenient.  The East Branch did what it could, in particular reaching out to the Hardy School, and taking part in Library Week 1943, whose slogan that war year was “Build the Future with Books.”  But its programming had to be limited to story hours.

Detail of flier for 1943 Library Week activities. (Robbins Library archives)

Detail of flier for 1943 Library Week activities. (Robbins Library archives)

It was hoped that postwar prosperity would soon bring positive changes to the East Branch.  Its physical plant left it out of the mainstream compared to the other two library locations in Arlington.  Popular exhibits were routine at the main library and the Dallin Branch.  In 1949, the East Branch finally had an exhibit that it had room to display:   “small dolls, little elephants, squirrels, penguins, bird baths and others,” all made from unpainted sea shells.  The scale of the sole exhibit to reach the East Branch became unintentionally emblematic of the reality that serious improvements could wait no longer.

Retiree William B. Fleming of 306 Appleton St., “Artist in Sea Shells” with some of his creations exhibited at the East Branch Library in 1949. (Arlington News photograph)

Retiree William B. Fleming of 306 Appleton St., “Artist in Sea Shells” with some of his creations exhibited at the East Branch Library in 1949. (Arlington News photograph)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The second half of the Fox Branch Library history will appear later in this centennial year.

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One Response to 100 years of Fox Branch Library: Part One

  1. Pingback: Fox Library 100th Birthday Celebration | Robbins Library Blog

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